home alarm companies

home alarm security systems

95 per monthIt wasn't all that long ago that having a home security system meant signing up with a company that would send a professional installer to your house to drill holes in your walls and run wires throughout your home. In most cases the equipment was free, but you had to commit to a multi year monitoring contract as part of the deal. There are still a handful of security companies such as ADT, Slomin's, and Vivint, that will send a consultant out to your house to configure a system specifically tailored to your home and then send a team of professionals to install everything, but more and more companies are offering do it yourself DIY home security solutions. DIY home security systems come in all shapes and sizes. Some systems come with an LCD panel that serves as the brains of the system. The panel is typically installed on a wall in a central area of your home and connects wirelessly to your home network. Most of these panels use capacitive touch screens and contain multiple radios that allow them to wirelessly control Wi Fi, Z Wave, Zigbee, and Bluetooth sensors and home automation components. Most panels also contain a cellular radio that connects them to a monitoring center if you subscribe to a professional monitoring plan, and they almost always have a speaker and a microphone for two way communication with a monitoring agent. The cellular radio is also used to push updates to the system. For example, the $229 SimpliSafe Foundation is a starter kit that gives you the hub, a door/window sensor, a motion sensor, and a yard sign. Additional door/window sensors go for $14.

seniors alert systems

If you signup for AlarmNet for Interactive Services and possibly Total Connect 2, you are sort of “locked” to your selected dealer for monitoring services. You can still change dealers at any time of course but it will require a factory reset defaulting the panel which blows away all existing panel settings and zone configuration. Honeywell has decided, and just for Lyric it seems, to make dealer “takeovers” of monitoring accounts very difficult since they now require the new dealer or DIY homeowner to reenter/reprogram all wireless sensors and more into the controller from scratch. If you start with a good monitoring vendor this will never be a problem, but we have an issue making it so burdensome for users to switch if their dealer service levels fall or their pricing is no longer competitive. If you don’t buy the equipment outright, Vivint requires either a four or five year contract — a long time to commit, especially given that you only have three days from the date of install to cancel. Afterwards, you’ll have to pay out the remainder of your contract.